5779 or 2018?

By Pastor Rob Fuquay | 09/14/2018
This past Monday was Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. According to ancient Jewish writings, based on dating of creation, this is year 5,779. Of course, that is not scientific. We know, as most Jewish people recognize, the age of creation is much older. The Jewish calendar recognizes a faith perspective, the movement of the days toward a big event. What is that? The Messiah. These ancient writings believe the Messiah will come by the year 6000.
 
Of course, the Christian calendar says this year is 2018. Our calendar dates from the arrival of Christ. It recognizes our faith perspective, the days since Jesus was born which we celebrate. This is why 2018 is AD-Addo Domini, "year of our Lord." Everything before was BC, Before Christ, or as is more politically correct to say BCE, Before the Common Era.
 
My question is: What year is it for you?
 
Do you have an exact time you accepted Christ into your life? How many days or years has it been since that time? Maybe it wasn't an exact moment. Perhaps you don't remember not believing. Your calendar might be all the years you've lived. Maybe faith in Christ happened over a period of your life. Your calendar might be more of a guesstimate, sort of like putting a date on creation. So would this be year 1, 20 or 75?
 
If we think about it, determining a faith calendar is important. We should live with both a Jewish and Christian perspective - anticipating and celebrating. We should live each day with a sense of celebration that we have a Savior who loves us, who forgives us and is present to help us. Whatever worries come into our days we have a Savior to steer us through them.
 
Yet, we should also anticipate. Christ is not through. Each day holds the potential of new revelation. God is always ready to do a new thing. "Watch and wait," Jesus told the disciples in one place. "Be ready," in another. The life of faith is about looking for God to appear at any time and place.
 
So which is it? 5779 or 2018? The right faith answer is 0. Today marks a new beginning. Today God is ready to appear in a new way. It all depends, I suppose, on what we celebrate and anticipate. What is that for you?

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